Connect with us
Byron Bay News and Weather copy
The Northern Rivers News
Mt Warning News and Weather copy
The Northern Rivers Weekly Advertising
Kyogle News
The Northern Rivers Motoring News
Grafton News and Events copy
The Northern Rivers Funerals
The Northern Rivers WeeklyPuzzles
Byron Bay News and Weather copy
The Northern Rivers News
Mt Warning News and Weather copy
The Northern Rivers Weekly Advertising
Kyogle News
The Northern Rivers Motoring News
Grafton News and Events copy
The Northern Rivers Funerals
The Northern Rivers WeeklyPuzzles
Puzzles
previous arrow
next arrow

Local News

Larnook: 100 years of school memories

Published

on

Larnook: 100 years of school memories

By Samantha Elley

Swimming lessons in the creek, riding horses to school, running around barefoot in the playground, Empire Day celebrations.

These are the memories of staff and students over the last hundred years of Larnook Public School.

Opened in 1922, members of the community will be gathering on June 10 to celebrate the little school’s centenary.

Steve Clough was principal at the school from 2004, where he was relieving, then took on the permanent role in 2005 and stayed until his retirement in 2018.

“It was a two teacher school with an enrolment anywhere from 27 children up to 49,” said Mr Clough.

“Classes were broken up into K-2 then 3-6.”

During his time as principal, Mr Clough said Larnook became part of the Big Scrub program.

“This is where the 12 small schools in the area, including Blakebrook, Caniaba, Coffee Camp and Corndale and Wian Wian had special days where we got together and went on excursions,” he said.

“The end of year concert was big. Every two years we would do a whole school concert.

“One year we did Mary Poppins and another year it was Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.”

Betty Bressan went to Larnook from 1961 to 1967 and was one of the three Volpatti sisters.

“We lived close to the school, so would go home for lunch,” she said.

“We had swimming lessons in the creek, where our fathers would clean it of debris and weeds until they declared it safe.

“Then our mums would come and be the life savers and safety officers.

“Bullrush stings were the worst things that happened.”

Betty said the school was a lovely place, with a mix of Italian and Australian students at that time.

“Everyone got on really well,” she said.

“There was no such thing as bullying as we were all equal.

“When I left in 1967, there were only 15 students but by the time of the Aquarius festival, many came into the area and bought property.

“The numbers of students increased, so that’s when they brought in demountables.

“The current office was the old schoolroom.”

Mabel Adams believes she is the oldest student still living, as she started at Larnook school in 1945, the year she turned seven.

“There were 15 children and the teacher when I started,” she said.

“My best friend was Ellen Donodel and even though she was only at the school for a year, she is still my best friend today.

“She was my bridesmaid and I was her matron of honour.”

Mabel remembers riding her horse to and from school each day.

There was a horse paddock opposite the school where the horses would be left.

“One day I was riding home from school and I got into a cantering race with one of the boys,” she said.

“Then my saddle slipped right off the horse.

“I spent a week at home and my mother had to walk the three miles to the school to tell them I wouldn’t be coming.”

Learning to write was done with pencil on special books with blue lines for small letters and red lines for capital letters.

“It was like calligraphy,” said Mabel.

“We learnt with a softish pencil, then pen and ink. The pen was a nib at the end of a wooden piece and we had ink wells in the desk.”

Betty said she had been looking forward to using the nib and ink, but biros were introduced to students by then.

Both ex-students remember the end of school Christmas concerts and their athletics carnivals.

“Empire Day was celebrated in the school,” said Betty.

“Children put on performances and the parents came to watch and would bring a plate.”

Mabel remembers one particular Christmas concert where they performed a play called ‘Santa Claus comes down the chimney’.

“A lot was going on as we were making props and another girl and I were the two main actors,” she said.

“When Santa Claus was to come out of the chimney we weren’t supposed to laugh.

“But when we saw those two legs come down, we both burst out laughing.

“I still got a prize for best actress that year.”

Neither of the students remember wearing uniforms. In fact, they were lucky to be wearing shoes.

“We had sandals but a lot of the country boys just turned up with bare feet,” said Betty.

Both ladies will be attending the June 10 celebrations at the school.

“Everything was like a best memory,” said Mabel of her time at Larnook school.

“This school has been really something to me.”

Larnook Public School is calling for memorabilia and photos to display at their June 10 event, which starts at 10am at the school, 1282 Cawongla Road, Larnook.

The official opening will be at 10.30am with morning tea and a small selection of lunch sandwiches for a gold coin donation.

Coffee cart and Amici Italian food van will be available, as will souvenirs for sale.

Please bring cash as eftpos can be unreliable and please RSVP to help with catering.

For further information or to provide memories, call 6688 0133 or email larnookcentenary@gmail.com

Local News

Grants Propel Housing Delivery in Regional NSW

Published

on

By

Regional Housing Strategic Planning Fund

Grants Propel Housing Delivery in Regional NSW

 

Nearly $3 million in funding from the NSW Government is set to expedite the delivery of almost 24,000 new regional homes, with 16 councils securing grants under the second round of the Regional Housing Strategic Planning Fund. Ranging from the North Coast to the Central West and the Riverina, these councils will receive grants of up to $250,000 each.

The objective of these grants is to accelerate the delivery of new homes in regional areas through various strategies, including the formulation of housing plans, infrastructure preparation, and amendments to local environmental plans to facilitate the construction of diverse and affordable housing options.

As more individuals opt for regional NSW living, the demand for homes has increased, leading to rising prices and a shortage of available properties. Hence, bolstering regional housing supply is paramount.

These grants are part of a broader set of initiatives aimed at boosting regional housing supply, including the expansion of the Government’s Urban Development Program, the Regional Housing Flying Squad, the Regional Housing Fund, and the Accelerated Infrastructure Fund.

Together, these initiatives aim to streamline the planning process, support necessary infrastructure development, and aid regional councils in their housing-related endeavours.

Regional Housing Strategic Planning Fund

16 councils securing grants under the second round of the Regional Housing Strategic Planning Fund.

In Round 1 of the Regional Housing Strategic Planning Fund, $3.85 million was allocated to 20 projects across 19 councils. Notable projects include the Raymond Terrace Sub-Precincts Master Plan collaboration between Port Stephens Council and Homes NSW, aimed at expediting affordable housing supply.

Another project by Port Stephens Council focused on addressing development barriers such as drainage and flooding resilience in the Shoal Bay Precinct.

Armidale Regional Council, another recipient of Round 1 funding, successfully developed and implemented its Local Housing Strategy.
For further details on the councils receiving funding and their respective projects, interested parties can visit the NSW Planning website.

Minister for Planning and Public Spaces Paul Scully emphasised the importance of supporting regional councils in expediting housing delivery for their communities. He highlighted the crucial role of regional NSW in the state’s housing supply landscape and underscored the government’s commitment to ensuring housing targets are met while also addressing future hazards.

 

For more real estate news, click here.

Continue Reading

Local News

AI: Transforming Real Estate in Four Ways

Published

on

By

AI Transforming real estate

AI: Transforming Real Estate in Four Ways

 

In a world where AI reigns supreme, the real estate industry is undergoing a revolutionary transformation. Gone are the days of manual property searches and mundane tasks. AI is reshaping the landscape, empowering professionals, and enhancing customer experiences like never before.

Here are four ways AI is revolutionising real estate:

  1. Enhanced Customer Satisfaction: AI-powered assistants engage with clients, address queries, and provide personalised recommendations, offering round-the-clock support. This frees up professionals’ time to focus on high-value tasks, leading to unparalleled customer experiences.
  2. Empowered Property Search: AI algorithms analyse vast amounts of data to deliver accurate insights and personalised recommendations, streamlining the property search process. Buyers and professionals can make more informed decisions quickly, aligning with customer demands.
  3. Better Data for Investors: AI simplifies property valuation and risk assessment by analysing real-time data and identifying patterns. Investors can make informed decisions based on predictive analytics, ensuring profitable investments in a dynamic market.
  4. Simplified Property Management: AI-driven smart home technologies automate routine tasks, monitor energy consumption, and detect maintenance issues in real-time. This streamlines property management, reduces costs, and optimises property performance.
AI Transforming real estate

In a world where AI reigns supreme, the real estate industry is undergoing a revolutionary transformation.

AI is not only transforming real estate operations but also propelling the industry into predictive analytics. By leveraging historical data and market trends, AI algorithms forecast future property prices and demand, empowering professionals to seize profitable opportunities and stay ahead of the curve. With AI, the future of real estate looks promising.

 

For more real estate news, click here.

Continue Reading

Local News

2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado Unveiled: A Powerhouse Upgrade Ready to Conquer Australian Roads

Published

on

By

2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado

2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado Unveiled: A Powerhouse Upgrade Ready to Conquer Australian Roads

 

By Jeff Gibbs

Toyota Australia is gearing up for the highly anticipated launch of the 2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado, set to hit the market with a range of new features and enhancements aimed at solidifying its position as a top contender in the SUV segment. With a mid-year launch on the horizon, the automaker has revealed key details about the upcoming Prado, including its variant line-up and advanced drivetrain specifications.

The new Prado will boast five distinct grades, catering to a wide range of preferences and driving needs. From the entry-level GX to the top-tier Kakadu spec, buyers can expect a comprehensive selection of options. Notably, the line-up will introduce an all-new ‘Altitude’ variant, specially designed for off-road enthusiasts seeking enhanced performance and rugged capabilities.

  1. “Toyota Takes the Lead: 2024 Toyota Prado Firming Up for Mid-2024 Launch”
  2. “Hybrid Heartache: All-New Toyota LandCruiser Prado to Stick with Diesel Until 2025″
  3. “2024 Toyota Prado Pioneers Off-Road Innovation: A Challenger to the 4×4 Throne?”
2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado Interior.

2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado Interior.

Under the hood, the 2024 Prado will feature a formidable 2.8-litre turbo-diesel four-cylinder powertrain, equipped with innovative 48-volt assistance technology. This cutting-edge drivetrain, shared with the face lifted HiLux, delivers robust performance with 150kW of power and 500Nm of torque, paired with an efficient eight-speed automatic transmission. Furthermore, Toyota assures drivers of exceptional towing capability, with the Prado capable of handling a 3500kg braked trailer.

In terms of design and technology, each Prado variant comes packed with an array of premium features aimed at maximising comfort, convenience, and driving pleasure. LED headlights, a 12.3-inch multimedia screen with wireless smartphone connectivity, and a 10-speaker audio system are just a few highlights available across the range. Additionally, specific grades offer luxurious touches such as heated and ventilated seats, a refrigerated console box, and advanced driver assistance systems for enhanced safety and control.

2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado

2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado

Toyota Australia’s Vice President of Sales and Marketing, Sean Hanley, expressed excitement about the upcoming release, emphasising the Prado’s longstanding legacy of reliability and performance. He highlighted the vehicle’s versatility in catering to diverse lifestyles and adventures, reaffirming Toyota’s commitment to delivering top-tier SUVs that meet the evolving needs of Australian consumers.

With pricing details yet to be announced, anticipation is high for the arrival of the 2024 Toyota LandCruiser Prado. As drivers prepare to embark on new journeys and conquer challenging terrains, Toyota’s latest offering promises to set a new standard for excellence in the SUV market. Stay tuned for more updates and information as the launch date approaches.

Details will be confirmed closer to the Prado’s launch in mid-2024.

 

For more motoring news, click here.

Continue Reading

Latest News

error: Alert: Content is protected !!
Verified by MonsterInsights