Connect with us
Byron Bay News and Weather copy
Mt Warning News and Weather copy
Kyogle News
Grafton News and Events copy
Byron Bay News and Weather copy
Mt Warning News and Weather copy
Kyogle News
Grafton News and Events copy
previous arrow
next arrow

Education

Petition launched to get kids back to their school

Published

on

Richie Williamson with local residents at Broadwater Public School.
Advertisements
NOTICE OF MEMBERS EXTRAORINDARY LAND DEALING MEETING

Petition launched to get kids back to their school

 

By Samantha Elley

School students from Broadwater just want to be able to walk or ride their bikes to their school.

This will not happen anytime soon, according to Broadwater Public School P&C Association secretary Emma Crethar, due to the government’s choice of planning approval for repairs after the February 2022 flood.

Despite other schools in the Northern Rivers area, in the process of being renovated, were put through the Review of Environmental Factors (REF) planning pathway, used for state government public infrastructure projects, the repairs for Broadwater Public School have been issued with a development application that has gone through Richmond Valley Council.

“The DA process at lightning speed will take at best, six months before the school can be used,” said State Member for Clarence, Richie Williamson, who was on hand to launch the petition against the development application process, with support from the P&C.

“Using the REF process, it can be approved by the end of the week.”

Richie Williamson with local residents at Broadwater Public School.

Richie Williamson with local residents at Broadwater Public School.

Mr Williamson said he has written to the state education minister, Ms Prue Car, to ask why the government has chosen to go down the DA path for Broadwater school, rather than the REF path, as has been done with local schools at Empire Vale and Wardell.

“As yet I cannot answer why, as I am waiting to hear back,” he said.

Mr Williamson said the project could be completed in just eight weeks as it’s a pre-fabricated build that is almost finished.

A project update from School Infrastructure NSW stated that while a REF pathway was initially considered for Broadwater, it was decided a DA pathway was preferable.

“This is due to the nature and location of the Broadwater Public School site, and the need for the assessment to be rigorous and transparent,” the update said.

No explanation around what the nature is or why the location made a difference was forthcoming in the update.

Ms Crethar said there were students in Kindergarten and Year One who were yet to even experience their school.

“Right now they are learning in demountables at Evans Head K-12 school,” she said.

Broadwater Public School

Broadwater Public School

“They have a small school sectioned off and the playground is not big enough for kids to really play.

“They have to take a 40 minute bus ride and don’t get home until 4.15pm.

“The kids just want to ride their bikes to school.”

The petition has been launched in Broadwater and the surrounding areas requesting the state government do the following:

  • Withdraw the current development application that is before Richmond Valley Council.
  • Issue development consent using the traditional method of a Review of Environmental Factors (REF) planning pathway that is common practice for State Government public infrastructure projects.

Any NSW citizen can sign the petition which will be available in local businesses or by contacting Mr Williamson’s office on 6643 1244 or online here.  Original signatures are required on all Petitions.

 

For more Richmond Valley news, click here.

Advertisements
Tenterfield-The Bowlo

Education

ETC Launches Second Year of First Nations Scholarships Program to Foster Indigenous Education and Empowerment

Published

on

By

ETC First Nations Scholarships Program
Advertisements
NOTICE OF MEMBERS EXTRAORINDARY LAND DEALING MEETING

ETC Launches Second Year of First Nations Scholarships Program to Foster Indigenous Education and Empowerment

 

Enterprise and Training Company (ETC), a leading provider of employment, training, and business services, is excited to announce the continuation of its First Nations Scholarships Program for the second year. This program reflects ETC’s unwavering commitment to promoting reconciliation and supporting the education and empowerment of Indigenous Australians across the regions where it operates.

As an organization that values inclusivity and social responsibility, ETC recognizes the critical role of education in driving empowerment and social change. The First Nations Scholarships Program aims to provide financial assistance and support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals aged 15 and above, who are pursuing further education or vocational training. By enhancing their skills and knowledge, these scholarships empower recipients to succeed in high-demand industries and contribute to building a more equitable society.

“At ETC, we believe that education is a key driver of empowerment and social change,” said ETC’s CEO Damon Munt.

“Through our First Nations Scholarships Program, we aim to create opportunities for First Nations Australians to access quality education and training, and contribute to building a more equitable society in the regions we serve.”

The First Nations Scholarships Program will provide 3 successful applicants with $2500 each in funding to cover things like tuition fees, course materials, and travel expenses related to their education needs.

“We understand that financial barriers can often hinder access to education and training for our First Nations people,” added ETC’s Indigenous Services Manager Ceharnie Martin.

“Our Scholarships Program aims to alleviate these barriers and provide much-needed support to Indigenous Australians who are striving for educational success and economic empowerment.”

Eligibility Criteria:

  • Applicants must identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.
  • They must be over 15 years of age.
  • Applicants should express their current career goals and specific industries of interest.
  • Formal training requirements necessary for achieving career goals should be outlined.
  • Financial hardship experienced by applicants will be considered.
  • Active participation in the local community (e.g., through volunteer work or leadership roles) is valued.
  • Recipients are encouraged to consider how their scholarship benefits the local community.

ETC encourages First Nations individuals who are interested in furthering their education or vocational training to explore the opportunities offered by the First Nations Scholarships Program. Applications are now open and close on Friday 19 July.

Further details, including eligibility criteria and application process, can be found here.

 

For more Education news, click here.

Advertisements
Tenterfield-The Bowlo
Continue Reading

Education

CRT PRIMARY SCHOOLS PROGRAM PROVIDES $50,000 FOR COUNTRY SCHOOL KIDS

Published

on

By

CRT PRIMARY SCHOOLS PROGRAM
Advertisements
NOTICE OF MEMBERS EXTRAORINDARY LAND DEALING MEETING

CRT PRIMARY SCHOOLS PROGRAM PROVIDES $50,000 FOR COUNTRY SCHOOL KIDS

 

25 primary schools across regional and rural Australia will receive a boost thanks to funding through the 2024 CRT Primary Schools Program.

In its third year, the CRT Primary Schools Program will distribute $50,000 among Parents and Friends Associations (P&Fs) of primary schools in regional and rural Australia.

Head of Independents, Rebecca Gay highlighted the program’s overwhelming response this year.

“We received over 100 applications, making it a challenging task for the selection panel to narrow it down to the 25 successful applicants,” said Ms Gay.

“CRT stores are local employers in many regional communities, and schools play a vital role in these areas. This program aims to recognise the crucial contributions P&F associations make in fostering the growth and development of the next generation.”

“We believe investing in primary schools is an investment in a smart, strong, and confident future for regional Australia.”

This year’s funding will support various initiatives, including improving outdoor play spaces, upgrading technologies in the classroom, and providing funding for sporting and educational equipment and ag learning resources.

“We’re seeing many P&F associations eager to connect with agriculture through cattle clubs and paddock to play initiatives. These projects provide students with a hands-on connection to food and agriculture and a chance to immerse themselves in the outdoors,” said Ms Gay.

“We’re also pleased to be able to fund excursions and extracurricular activities, which are often a struggle for regional and remote schools to access.”

The CRT Primary Schools Program will return in 2025. For a list of successful applicants visit: https://www.crt.com.au/primary-schools-program/.

 

For more Education news, click here.

Advertisements
Tenterfield-The Bowlo
Continue Reading

Casino NSW News

A visit with Gary Eck and the moon

Published

on

By

Gary Eck reading his book The Day the Moon Came to Stay to children at Casino Christian School.
Advertisements
NOTICE OF MEMBERS EXTRAORINDARY LAND DEALING MEETING

A visit with Gary Eck and the moon

 

By Samantha Elley

It’s not every day you get to hear about the moon coming for a visit, but that was what happened to Casino Christian School students when author and standup comedian Gary Eck came to visit last week.

As part of Beef Week celebrations, Gary read his latest children’s book, The Day the Moon Came to Stay to a group of very invested and intrigued Kindie and Year One students.

“I kind of see myself in a sense as a story teller,” he said.

“Everything I do has some sort of narrative. I am a stand up comic by trade.

“I’ve been doing it for 30 years and that in itself is micro-storytelling, telling short jokes, long jokes.

“I’ve always aspired to longer form stuff.”

From the days of Tropfest, where he won with his short film The Money in 2014, to his work in Happy Feet 2 with George Miller, Gary has always been involved in telling stories.

His recent work has been involved in telling stories to children, including the animated series Ginger and the Vegesaurs, which can be viewed on ABC Kids.

“We are in our third season, which comes out in June,” he said.

“It’s the number two show on the BBC, just behind Bluey.”

His latest book, which he was able to read to the students at the school, is entitled The Day the Moon Came to Stay.

“This one, I remember when my son was about three and there was a big full moon,” he said.

“I was holding him and he was looking up at the moon and he was trying to grab (it).”

“Then I thought ‘what if the moon came here and it was only six feet tall?’.”

From there, as Gary said, the story wrote itself where the main character, Billy, sees the moon is sad and so sends an invitation to the big celestial being to come for a visit.

A captivated audience of young listeners giggled and watched as Gary narrated the story, showing the effects of what happens when the moon visits.

Afterwards, he proceeded to show how you send a message to the moon via the Zoomer Boomer 3000 paper airplane.

The book, written by Gary Eck and illustrated by Nick O’Sullivan, is available online via Amazon.

 

For more Casino news, click here.

Advertisements
Tenterfield-The Bowlo
Continue Reading

NRTimes Online

Advertisement

National News Australia

Latest News

Verified by MonsterInsights