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Entertainment

ARTISTS IN CONVERSATION: PENNY EVANS AND BETTY RUSS

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Betty Russ, 'Earth Matter' - artist in conversation

ARTISTS IN CONVERSATION: PENNY EVANS AND BETTY RUSS

 

5pm, Thursday 15 February at the Lismore Regional Gallery — pop-up space
Hear from artists Penny Evans and Betty Russ about the processes and ideas behind their work in Earth Matter.

Betty Russ, 'Earth Matter' - artist in conversation

Betty Russ, ‘Earth Matter’. Courtesy the artist

About Penny Evans

Penny Evans is Lismore-based. Her ceramics and mixed media collages connect with family, community, and national histories in the wake of colonisation. She is the recipient of numerous awards and residencies and exhibits her work nationally, including CEREMONY, the 4th Indigenous Art Triennial at the National Gallery of Australia in 2022.

The focus of my art is always identity, country, and decolonising and my practice is a process driven enquiry. My artwork creates a trail over time, which mark and illustrate my decolonising journey back to who we are, back to country, back to country within me. There’s a lineage of ideas, a mapping. My interrogation is through the process of making, so it’s about DNA mixed with ideas gathered from many people and places, from country and kin.

About Betty Russ

Betty Russ is an artist and arts worker living on Widjabul Wia-bul country, Bundjalung Nation (Lismore). Working across sculpture, assemblage, installation, sound, and embodied research, her practice ferments between and around the philosophies and renderings of eschatological terror, speculative +/ science fiction, hauntology, spirituality, the-weird-and-the-eerie.

Material manifestations protrude from hypnagogic fantasy, searching for psychological mitigation to the abject shock of the past, and sweaty white-knuckled fear of the future. Betty is also co-founder of Elevator ARI, an emerging artist-run gallery and studio space.

The twin strobes of ‘The Monster’, and imminent global catastrophe have long created a tension around the vegetal, the-more-than-human, philosophy and the future. Popular culture uses speculative science fiction, fantasy and horror as a means to both ferment, and ignore mounting eschatological terror. I am drawn to the unreal, unimaginable, the weird and eerie, queering, and provocative ideas that emerge from making experimental investigations of other possible worlds to describe these tensions.

Seeking to identify false gods and the exhaltative exploitation of earth matter as a means of hyper-individuation and extractive capitalism, ‘Voiding Sartorial Sublimation’ is ironically both a praising and a parody of the elements of contemporary capitalised spirituality. Dreamed up while escaping into the ever more possible realms of science fiction, representing both enveloping terror and sublime love.

Details:

  • Artists in conversation
  • When: 5pm, Thursday 15 February
  • Where: Lismore Regional Gallery — pop-up space – 46 Magellan Street, Lismore
  • Cost: No charge, please reserve your ticket.
  • Accessibility: The venue is wheelchair accessible and there is an option to request Auslan interpretation at the time of booking.
  • Tickets: Available here.

 

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Entertainment

WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL BRISBANE

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WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL BRISBANE

WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL BRISBANE

 

15 to 24 March 2024

Brace yourselves for a mind‑blowing cosmic journey when World Science Festival Brisbane returns in 2024. For ten days from Friday, 15 March until Sunday, 24 March, World Science Festival Brisbane presents a program full of engaging conversations, awe‑inspiring events, art installations and so much more for visitors of all ages.

WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL BRISBANE

15 to 24 March 2024

Highlights:

  • Decoding Thought: AI’s New Breakthroughs and Boundaries
    Thursday, 21 March 2024, 7:30pm
    Leading researchers and privacy experts join Brian Greene to explore the function and ethical implications of this technological breakthrough.
  • Mysteries from the Museum
    Friday, 22 March 2024, 6pm
    A fragment of rock, a scrap of paper, a headless bird. Three ordinary, if slightly obscure objects, with three extraordinary stories.
  • Dream On: The Waste and Climate War
    Saturday, 23 March 2024, 1:30pm
    Planet advocate and environmental provocateur, Craig Reucassel plunges into Australia’s waste and climate crisis.
  • Life On Mars
    Friday, 22 March 2024, 7:30pm
    Graham Phillips and a panel of experts shed light on the intricacies of space exploration, the technological marvels of interplanetary missions and the profound questions they raise about life’s existence beyond our planet.

 

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Building a Collection, Sharing a Collection

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National Collection - tweed regional gallery

Building a Collection, Sharing a Collection

 

Tweed Regional Gallery to unveil extraordinary gift alongside additional works from the National Gallery of Australia’s Sharing the National Collection initiative

The Tweed Regional Gallery Foundation Ltd is hosting a special event at the Gallery on Thursday 29 February, honouring the generosity of individuals who play vital roles in supporting the development and preservation of public art collections.

An extraordinary gift from the Margaret Olley Art Trust will be unveiled at the event in honour of former long-serving director Susi Muddiman OAM and her invaluable service to the Tweed Regional Gallery. Susi led the team as Director of Tweed Regional Gallery for more than 16 years and received continual commendation for her passionate commitment and visionary approach.

Ticket-holders will be the first to view the generous gift, an important addition to the Gallery’s collection and a significant storyteller of a particular time in Olley’s extraordinary life and enduring career.

Alongside the gift’s unveiling, the event includes a preview of artworks on loan from the National Gallery of Australia as part of the Sharing the National Collection initiative. This landmark initiative from Revive, Australia’s National Cultural Policy, allows the National Gallery to share its collection through long-term loans with regional and suburban galleries across the country.

Joining Monet’s Meules, milieu du jour [Haystack’s, midday], 1890 currently on display at the Tweed Regional Gallery, will be three works by one of Australia’s most celebrated artists, Margaret Olley, and a painting by the iconic artist Giorgio Morandi, one of Olley’s favourite painters of still life.

Building a National Collection - Tweed Regional Gallery

Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre Director Ingrid Hedgcock is excited for the launch of several new exhibitions. BELOW: Guests enjoying a Foundation-hosted event at Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre, 2023.

Ticket-holders will hear from esteemed guests: Trustee of the Margaret Olley Art Trust Philip Bacon OAM, Head, Art Across Australia – National Gallery of Australia Tracy Cooper-Lavery, Director Gallery & Visual Arts at HOTA Susi Muddiman OAM and Uncle Victor Slockee.

Gallery Director Ingrid Hedgcock invited supporters to join her and special guests for this significant occasion.

“The event is a celebration of passionate individuals who play a crucial role in building and shaping our public art collection,” Ms Hedgcock said.

Guests will be able to enjoy drinks generously provided by Tweed Regional Gallery Foundation supporters Husk Distillers, and a selection of canapés by Apex Dining, while mingling with other art enthusiasts and experiencing the Gallery’s latest exhibition A Delicate Terrain.

The exhibition is curated from the Tweed Regional Gallery collection and showcases the work of renowned contemporary Australian artists. A Delicate Terrain will be on display from Saturday 2 March until Sunday 26 January 2025.

Event details:

Building a Collection, Sharing a Collection will be held from 5.30 – 7 pm on Thursday 29 February 2024 at Tweed Regional Gallery & Margaret Olley Art Centre. Tickets cost $35 – $55. Book now via Humanitix here.

Meules, milieu du jour [Haystack’s, midday], 1890 by Claude Monet will be on display until 26 October 2025.

Pomegranate I 1976, Katie’s quinces 1976, [Morning interior] c.1973 by Margaret Olley and Natura morta [Still life] 1956 by Giorgio Morandi are on long-term loan from late February until 2029. These 5 works of art are on long-term loan from the National Gallery of Australia with support from the Australian Government as part of Sharing the National Collection initiative.

#ArtAcrossAustralia

 

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A creative response to shortfalls in the health system

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Lennox Head artist Jenny Gill Schirmer, First Aid Exhibition

A creative response to shortfalls in the health system

 

By Sarah Waters

Lennox Head artist Jenny Gill Schirmer experienced a lot of ‘challenging moments’ while working as an emergency nurse in the Northern Rivers during covid and the 2022 floods.

She and many other frontline health care workers were left at the coalface as they juggled an influx of patients amidst limited medical resources, staff and communication.

To illustrate the shortcomings in the health system during that time – and process a lot of the strain she witnessed behind the scenes – Ms Schirmer turned to art.

Her latest exhibition titled First Aid is currently on display at the Northern Rivers Community Gallery in Ballina.

It features a series of poignant art pieces, made from a variety of mediums, including ceramic sculptures, painting and assemblage, to give a clever insight into life as a frontline health worker.

One of the art pieces was made with found objects and shows a spanner placed behind metal bars.

Ms Schirmer said it highlighted the limited access to medical resources during the covid pandemic – and then the floods.

Jenny Gill Schirmer, First Aid Exhibition on at the Northern Rivers Community Gallery until March 3

Jenny Gill Schirmer, First Aid Exhibition on at the Northern Rivers Community Gallery until March 3

It wasn’t necessarily because the resources weren’t there but accessing them became the hard part.

Different authorities decided what the regional emergency and health services were supplied with.

Frontline health care staff also became in short supply with many being forced to isolate after they caught covid or were a close contact.

It was then up to their colleagues to carry the additional workload.

“We were all watching the impact covid had around the world,” Ms Schirmer said.

“The increase of cases was expected, and we were prepared for it.

“But it was really hard to access what we needed.

“We somehow managed to provide the level of care we would usually give, but that’s because staff were working long hours,” she said.

As healthcare workers pushed through covid, the 2022 floods came and put further strain on a system already at the brink.

Many health care workers were affected by the floods but chose to continue to work.

Lennox Head artist Jenny Gill Schirmer, First Aid Exhibition

One of the art pieces created by Lennox Head artist Jenny Gill Schirmer, which is part of her exhibition First Aid, currently on display at the Northern Rivers Community Gallery.

Ms Schirmer’s favourite art piece in the exhibition is titled ‘Veneer.’

She sculptured 30 porcelain faces, positioned on different angles, which are seen through a wooden frame.

“It represents the different faces of a health care worker,” she said.

“The faces are made of porcelain, which looks really fragile, but it’s actually really strong.

“We all go to work and put on our brave face, but what people don’t realise is there’s often a lot going on behind that.

“The staff were becoming really burnt out and a lot of them had to work double shifts.”

The story of the indomitable spirit of Northern Rivers health care workers continues in the First Aid exhibition.

It will be on display at Northern Rivers Community Gallery until March 3.

More of Ms Schirmer’s artwork is available to view here.

 

For more local Lennox Head news, click here.

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