Connect with us
The Northern Rivers Times | NSW Northern Rivers News
The Northern Rivers Times Rural News
The Northern Rivers Times News Edition 107
The Northern Rivers Times | NSW Northern Rivers News
The Northern Rivers Times Rural News Edition 107
The Northern Rivers Times News Edition 107
previous arrow
next arrow

2022 Floods

State of the art early learning centre opens in Bangalow

Published

on

State of the art early learning centre opens in Bangalow

State of the art early learning centre opens in Bangalow

Contemporary early learning provider, Harmony Early Learning, opened its second centre in Northern NSW at Bangalow over the weekend.
The new 60-children facility caters for children from birth to five years and has been designed with a focus on the unique needs of children, promoting physical activity and a connection among children that improves behaviour, self-esteem, and academic performance.

State of the art early learning centre opens in Bangalow

The new 60-children facility caters for children from birth to five years

The state-of-the-art centre features Harmony’s exclusive design and offering, incorporating large outdoor green spaces, luxury designed interiors encompassing neutral colours and textures.

A community open day was held on Saturday, with the invite extended to the entire Bangalow community in much need of some cheer, with guests treated to samples of the food created by the on-site chefs, live music, coffee, gelato and food trucks. Families and children were entertained with face painting and bubble shows.

Peter Warner, Chief Executive Officer of Harmony Early Learning, said the centre was developed in response to increasing demand from families seeking premium quality, local childcare facilities in the high growth area.

“This is one of our most beautiful centres to date – it’s architecturally designed with high end furniture and finishes, a calming, neutral colour palette and lighting complemented by audio visual to foster a healthy learning environment for our children.
“We have been cultivating our unique service offering including an evidence based early learning curriculum, purposefully designed natural playscapes, and onsite chefs to fuel the next generation with appropriate nutrition. Underpinning Harmony’s approach to learning is an evidence-based early learning curriculum, the Active Early Learning (AEL) Study”.

“We have received great feedback from our existing centre in Lennox Head, so we are delighted to be able to offer our experience to more families across the Northern NSW region.”

State of the art early learning centre opens in Bangalow

The new 60-children facility caters for children from birth to five years and has been designed with a focus on the unique needs of children, promoting physical activity and a connection among children that improves behaviour, self-esteem, and academic performance.

Nicole Savino, Harmony’s newest Centre Director, said that the open day was a great success and a reminder of how important a sense of community is in the early learning space.

“It was amazing to see the community come together and welcome us so warmly to the region,” said Ms Savino. “And we are looking forward to our first day of operations, which is planned for Monday the 28st of March.”
The Bangalow centre is just one of six that Harmony plans to open this calendar year across Northern NSW and Southeast Queensland, increasing its footprint by over 50 per cent.

In efforts to help those affected by the floods, Harmony will be donating over 300 age-appropriate books for displaced families as a result of the flood crisis, with other Harmony centres across Northern NSW and Southeast Queensland running flood donation drives, collecting food, clothing, toiletries and cleaning products for those in need.

 

 

About Harmony Early Learning

State of the art early learning centre opens in Bangalow

The state-of-the-art centre features Harmony’s exclusive design and offering, incorporating large outdoor green spaces, luxury designed interiors encompassing neutral colours and textures.

Harmony currently operates 10 early learning centres across South-East Queensland and Northern New South Wales with a foundation built on ensuring every child receives the best care and education possible in a safe, calm, fun and friendly learning setting.
Different than other centres, our holistic approach to early learning is based on extensive research and the work of renowned inspirational theorists. Our qualified educators draw on the knowledge and philosophies of these experts to create an environment that allows for exceptional learning and development.

2022 Floods

Housing demand creates planning challenges

Published

on

By

NSW Northern Rivers Breaking News

Housing demand creates planning challenges

The current lack of affordable and diverse housing for buyers and renters is a crisis which is confronting all levels of government.

A move to regional areas, limited government investment in social housing, a boom in short terms rentals, COVID-19, the recent floods and inflation have put great pressures on the property market.

While housing is primarily the responsibility of federal and state governments, Tweed Shire Council plays a key role as a determining authority/regulator for housing and planning law.

 

Council acts on unauthorised dwellings. Over the last 2 years, Council has contributed to an increased supply of affordable housing by encouraging diverse and affordable housing through the approval of more than 130 DAs involving secondary dwelling (granny flats) development controls, in addition to established dual occupancy controls.

In recognising the housing crisis, Council has worked collectively through the Northern Rivers Joint Organisation (NRJO) and Local Government NSW, to be an advocate for action on new social housing supply and affordability policies.

Over the last 2 years, Council has contributed to an increased supply of affordable housing by encouraging diverse and affordable housing through the approval of more than 130 DAs involving secondary dwelling (granny flats) development controls, in addition to established dual occupancy controls.

Attached dual occupancy dwellings are also possible in many rural areas, in addition to established urban areas.

More information can be found at tweed.nsw.gov.au/granny-flats-secondary dwellings

Additional dual occupancy information can also be found at tweed.nsw.gov.au/dual-occupancy

While Council provides a supportive approach to people affected by the housing crisis, it also has an important statutory responsibility to ensure that any land uses or building works provide a safe and secure housing.

Council recently resolved at its 7 July 2022 meeting to reinforce its role in undertaking compliance action on unauthorised dwellings.

General Manager Troy Green said Council had rescinded the resolution at Item 21.1 of the 2 June 2022 Confidential Council Meeting. The resolution sought to extend an initial moratorium from its 4 November 2021 meeting on taking compliance action on unauthorised dwellings up until 30 September 2022.

“After attending a workshop and gaining additional advice from staff, Councillors acknowledged there may be significant risks for Council to extend the earlier moratorium,” Mr Green said.

“In response to the potential risk and liability identified, it was agreed that a late report be submitted to the Extraordinary Council Meeting of 7 July 2022, seeking to rescind Council’s resolution from the 2 June 2022 meeting.

“Council also resolved that any new compliance matters would be subject to the current requirements of Council’s adopted Compliance Policy.”

Unauthorised building works carried out without required formal approval and certification can pose significant risk to life and property.

In other scenarios, unauthorised building works could also be poorly located on sites which are flood prone, bushfire prone, contaminated or landslip areas and thereby present similar life-threatening, public health and environmental hazards.

Council encourages people to undertake their land use activities with proper consent and approvals to avoid causing a nuisance or acting in breach of legislation.

Council has a compliance policy which guides the approach and response to a range of compliance issues.

However we also rely on the community to report unauthorised work and provide evidence to assist Council in taking action.

Compliance officers use their discretion when dealing with such matters, taking into account the evidence, cost to the community of any action, details of the case, public policy and legal precedent.

Continue Reading

2022 Floods

MAYORAL MINUTE: Calls to include Clarence in flood data assessment

Published

on

By

MAYORAL MINUTE: Calls to include Clarence in flood data assessment

Clarence Valley Mayor Ian Tiley has demanded the Clarence be included in any 2022 flood studies and assessments after discovering the region had been ignored in initial assessments by a NSW Government department.

Mayor Tiley put forward the Minute at the June Council meeting upon advice from the Department of Planning and Environment that post flood data behaviour assessments already undertaken focused on the Richmond, Wilson, Brunswick and Tweed rivers – local government areas to the north of the Clarence Valley.

Clarence Valley Council was excluded from this work on the basis that flood levels at the Prince Street, Grafton gauge were not considered of the same scale as rivers to the north and that there was already sufficient historical data about river behaviour based on the level at Grafton.

 

The Clarence River peaked at 7.66m at Grafton-below the levee wall and 2013 flood levels.

Mayor Tiley stressed that this decision did not consider the significantly higher flood levels at towns and villages downstream. Grafton’s peak of 7.664m had an average exceedance probability* (AEP) of 6.6 per cent, compared to 2 per cent for Maclean’s 3.36m peak.

“The flood level at Grafton was not a predictor for the flood behaviour downstream,” Mayor Tiley said.

“It is clear the Clarence flood increased in volume as it moved downstream and staff consider it likely the extreme localised rainfall events in the tributaries of the lower catchment impacted Clarence River levels downstream of Grafton, and that post flood data behaviour assessments may inform these assumptions.”

 

The Maclean community fought gallantly to sandbag the town and prevent major flooding after the Clarence River’s peak of 3.36m exceeded the levee wall maximum height of 3.30m

CVC previously reported in April that Yamba experienced its biggest rainfall event on record, with 1267mm in February and March. This included 274.4mm on 28 February – the highest 24-hour February total on record – and 258.2mm on 1 March for a total of 532mm.

“There has been no event or combination of events since records began that comes close to the rainfall totals recorded at Yamba in February and March,” Clarence Valley Council Director Works and Civil Jamie Fleeting said at the time.

 

Harwood Island during the 2022 floods

The Mayoral Minute received unanimous support at the Clarence Valley Council Ordinary Meeting at Maclean Council Chambers.

Council will now advocate through the NSW Premier, Minister for Emergency Services and Resilience, Minister for Environment and Heritage and Member for Clarence that Clarence Valley Council and the Clarence River be included in any other post 2022 flood and storm event studies and assessments undertaken across the Northern Rivers by the Environment Heritage Group or any other State departments.

Continue Reading

2022 Floods

Free soil and water testing available

Published

on

By

Free soil and water testing available

In response to the recent floods and rainfall, North Coast Local Land Services is offering free
soil and water testing for flood affected landholders.
Carly Green, Advisory and Extension Officer in the Sustainable Agriculture team, said, “After
a flood, the quality of on-farm water changes and poor water quality can compromise
livestock health, soil health and affect plant productivity.
“If you suspect your water sources have been exposed to flood water, testing will help you
understand risks and limitations to production.
“Equipment such as irrigation systems can become congested with suspended solids, soil
particles, and mineral deposits.” Carly said.
North Coast Local Land Services is also offering soil testing kits. Flooding and high rainfall
can alter soil fertility and plant available nutrients through erosion, runoff, waterlogging,
leaching and sediment deposition.
Carly continued, “Testing your soil will provide a snapshot of the current state of soil fertility,
including any soil constraints that may need to be managed.
“Knowing your soil fertility and any limitations to production can help you make decisions and
discover potential savings.”
Feed testing is also available if required. Contact our team to discuss your needs by calling
1300 795 299 or Carly Green, Graduate Advisory and Extension Officer – Sustainable
Agriculture on 0456 561 862.

Continue Reading

Latest News

Subscribe for our newsletter!

error: Alert: Content is protected !!